UV Wavelengths

A full spectrum of options from 210 nm to 800 nm

Request more information about LED wavelengths

UV Wavelengths

A full spectrum of options from 210 nm to 800 nm

Phoseon absorbance detectors for chromatography and analytical instruments cover almost any LED wavelength of interest between 210 nm and 800 nm. Intensity of these LEDs is many times higher than traditional deuterium and tungsten lamps at the sample site.  In addition, new technologies are enabling light sources deep in the UV-C wavelength range at usable power levels. Protein and elemental analysis is possible at 215 nm or 220 nm wavelengths. Map your LED wavelengths

The irradiance (W/cm²) produced by UV LED light sources increases consistently year over year because of advancements in both diode and lamp technology. Today, UV LED is available at effective outputs higher than those offered by traditional UV curing lamp technologies.  UV LED lamp systems produce enough power to conquer a wide range of applications.

LEDs are solid state devices (diodes) that emit energy in the form of light when an electrical current passes through them in the forward biased direction. The wavelength of the emitted light depends on the material from which the diode is made, with each material emitting light in a very narrow waveband that is almost monochromatic.

The full spectrum of ultraviolet radiation, which is commonly subdivided into UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. Wavelength, a fundamental descriptor of electromagnetic energy, is the distance between corresponding points of a propagated wave. Typical UV light source emission wavelengths range from ultraviolet (UV-C 100-280nm, UV-B: 280-315nm, UV-A 315-400nm) to visible light (400-700nm) and infrared (700-3000nm).  Request more information about LED wavelengths

UV LED Compared to Traditional Deuterium and Tungsten Lamps


Intensity of LEDs is many times higher than traditional deuterium and tungsten lamps
Protein and elemental analysis is possible at 215 nm or 220 nm